Låt Den Rätte Komma In (2008)

I remember hearing a bit about this little Swedish vampire movie called “Let The Right One In” and how it was amazing and fantastic. A love story between two children, one being a vampire, and the world they live in being changed as their characters change. It’s a haunting film, a depressing and painful film, as well as being a beautiful and entrancing film.

Lonely, 12-year-old Oskar is an outsider; bullied, struggling to fit in at school and left alone to fend for himself at home while his mother works nights. One evening he meets the mysterious Eli, a pale young girl, who has moved in next door. Coinciding with her arrival is a series of inexplicable disappearances and murders…

The film is a bit slow, but having watched it twice now, it’s also worth every minute. I picked up things I missed prior, and I was also able to enjoy the film more the second time around. The performances, especially those of the children – all the children, not just the two main leads – is fantastic. But the girl that plays Eli, Lina Leandersson, is quite possibly the best out of all of them. She oozes pain and wisdom and age for such a young person that you genuinely believe she’s been twelve years old for a century or so. All the actors in the film are fantastic, and it’s a shame that the big bucks get spent on actors who can’t act in Hollywood when there’s such talented people all over the world who can do the job a billion times better.

This film is beautifully shot. There are many instances where you go “Wow, that’s cool.” It’s a film that has imagery that will stick in your mind for days after you watch it, imagery that will haunt you in your sleep and in your wake. It’s an absolutely entrancing film and you can’t do anything but be absolutely pulled into this world. It’s almost like a graphic novel – every shot is specific, the camera hardly moves. It’s also a very sterile and cold looking film.

There’s two ways you can view this film, and I’ll try to describe it without ruining anything. You can watch it as a straight up love story between two people, or you can see it as something more sinister happening to the main character, and it’s films that are able to have different perspectives that make them successful, because each person comes out of the cinema with their own interpretation of the story.

This film could, and should, be studied. I’m sure there’s a lot more going on that I still haven’t noticed, but it’s an important film and a film that people should go out of their way to see. This isn’t Twilight, this isn’t Underworld, this is a tragic, haunting love story between a vampire and a boy. And if that’s not scary, I don’t know what is. Three-and-a-half skulls.

Audio:
Let The Right One In is a very quiet movie; a subtle sound mix provides an unnerving experience to accompany the imagery. Rarely is music used as it is in Hollywood horror movies – the scenes of horror linger on the sound effects and screams alone. It’s a clear mix, in Swedish 5.1 (and also in DTS 5.1), with the central speaker doing most of the work. The front two speakers spit out the music while the rear speakers also deal with the music and environmental sound. Four skulls.

Video:
Let The Right One In is a bit of a bleak and depressing looking film, but it’s also one of the better looking ones I have seen on Blu-Ray. There were a lot of instances of grain, but every strand of hair was visible, you’re able to tell what fabric people’s clothes are made out of. It helps the image quality when the film is beautifully photographed, as well. Four-and-a-half skulls.

Extras:
A very tiny amount of extras made up for with an English audio-commentary and all features being in high-definition. Four skulls.

  • Audio Commentary is presented with author and screenwriter John Ajvide Lindqvist, and director Tomas Alfredson, spoken in English, much to my surprise. The commentary is informative and Lindqvist and Alfredson have a great rapport with each other, which shows in the finished film.
  • Deleted Scenes Four deleted scenes are presented. They are simply called “Scene 1”, “Scene 2” etc. Scenes two and four are sweet moments between Oskar and Eli, scene one shows Oskar being bullied and scene three is Virginia rejecting human food and drink.
  • Photo Gallery is a high-definition motion gallery with some beautiful pictures taken during production. It goes for almost four minutes and is worth a watch for budding photographers.
  • UK Trailer
  • Traitor Trailer A forced trailer at the beginning of the disc for the Don Cheadle film Traitor

Overall:
An American remake is on the way for those who are to lazy to read subtitles, but if you’re open minded and don’t mind a film outside of the safety zone of Hollywood, check this out, at least before you see the American remake. I can only rehash what I’ve already said – a bleak and beautiful film with fantastic performances, especially from Andersson. Four skulls.

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